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PFC Charles Veghts Jr.

Daily Courier - 28 December 1944
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Veghts of 247 East Fairview Avenue have received word that their son, PFC Charles Veghts, Jr., was wounded in combat in France on December 5th.  He went into the service in February, 19432, being assigned for overseas duty in November.

Daily Courier - 01 November 1945
Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., November 1. - PFC Charles Veghts, Jr., son of Mr. And Mrs. Charles Veghts, 247 East Fairview Avenue, Connellsville, Penna., currently is stationed at the Redistribution Station, where he will spend two weeks before reporting to his new assignment in the United States. Private Veghts was returned recently to the United States after having served eight months in France, as a rifleman in the infantry.  His decorations include the European Theater of Operations ribbon with one campaign star, Good Conduct Medal and the Purple Heart Medal.

A rifleman with the 100th Infantry Division, known as the "Soldiers of the Century", was activated at Fort Jackson, SC.  In late 1943, the division from Fort Jackson to winter maneuvers in the Tennessee mountains before moving to Fort Bragg for further training in 1944.  He then went by ship to France on the USAT "George Washington" in the midst of a hurricane and landed in Marseille in October 1944.  He then traveled north to the Citadel of Bitche and the Maginot Line, through the rugged terrain of the Vosges Mountains.  On December 5, while on patrol, his squad was engaged by the Germans during the 1st Battle of Bitche.  A number of soldiers were wounded , including Charles, who took machine gun fire to his legs.  He was air evacuated to London for many months of recovery.  He returned to Connellsville after discharge, married, and raised a family.

During WWII, Charles was awarded the Purple Heart Medal; EAME Service Medal with 2 Bronze Service Stars; WWII Victory Medal; American Theater Service Medal and the Good Conduct Medal.  

As a play on words, all members of the 100th Infantry Division were known as the "Sons of Bitche" for their liberation of Bitche, France.